Women’s Rights, Workers’ Rights and Racial Justice Advocates to host a #NativeWomensEqualPay Day Social Media Storm on

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MEDIA ADVISORY

Women’s Rights, Workers’ Rights and Racial Justice Advocates to host a #NativeWomensEqualPay Day Social Media Storm on

Thursday, September 27, 2018 at 2:00 pm ET.

September 27, 2018

 Washington, DC – Today, women’s rights advocates will host a social media storm at 2:00 pm ET/11:00 am PT in observance of Native Women’s Equal Pay Day – Thursday, September 27, 2018 using the hashtags #NativeWomensEqualPay, #DemandMore, and #Equity. Access the coalition toolkit and learn more about the gender wage gap for Native Women at www.nativewomensequalpayday.org.

 WHAT:  Native Women’s Equal Pay Day Coalition Social Media Storm

 WHEN:                       TODAY, Thursday, September 27, 2018 at 2:00 - 3:00 pm ET/11:00 am - 12:00 pm PT

 WHERE:                    Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and Snapchat using hashtags #NativeWomensEqualPay, #DemandMore, and #Equity.

BACKGROUND

Each year, Equal Pay Day is held in April, but when we look at the wage gap for women of color, the gap is far greater. When compared to all men, women are paid $.80 (cents) on the $1. When compared to White, non-Hispanic men, Native women are paid only $.57 (cents) on the $1 (using 2016 figures). This means the typical Native woman must work until September 2018 to be paid what the typical White man was paid at the end of December 2017. This gap contributes to Native Women having one of the highest poverty rates of all women.

 There are many contributors to the wage gap, including employment discrimination, gender and race- based bias, lack of pay transparency, an inadequate minimum wage and tipped minimum wage, unfair workplace practices, lack of affordable child care, lack of quality public education system, a dismantling of organized labor, and inadequate access to capital.

The wage gap for Native women, however, is exacerbated by our nation’s shameful history of oppression of Native communities, which still have consequences in the lives of Native Americans and in particular women and girls. More than 4 in 5 Native women have experienced violence in their lifetimes, with Native women being 10 times more likely to be murdered than the national average.

Moreover, it is estimated that nearly 300 Native women disappear in the US & Canada under suspicious circumstances each year. Unfortunately, the exact number is unknown because data collection for Native communities is lacking.

On this #NativeWomensEqualPay Day, in this critical year for our nation, at this pivotal moment for our democracy, and on this pivotal day for women, especially survivors of sexual assault and violence, women nationwide are demanding more. Native women are demanding tangible solutions from their employers, from the business community, and from officials at the local, state, federal, and tribal level for addressing each of the contributors to the gap and other areas of disparity for native women. Indeed, women are demanding equity of opportunity in all areas of American life, including within the workplace, our national economy, and under the law.

Questions or need a contact? Email info@nativewomensequalpayday.org.

CO-SPONSORS: As of this writing, the social media storm is co-sponsored by the following organizations. This list will be updated throughout the day at www.nativewomensequalpayday.org.

American Association of University Women California Women's Law Center

Catalyst

Equal Pay Today

Equal Rights Advocates

Friends of the Delaware County Women's Commission

Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) Legal Aid at Work

MomsRising

National Asian Pacific American's Forum (NAPAWF)

National Center for Law and Economic Justice National Council of Jewish Women

National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center

National Network to End Domestic Violence National Organization for Women

National Partnership for Women & Families National Women's Law Center

Native Americans in Philanthropy PathWays PA

Phenomenal Woman

People for the American Way PowHer New York

UltraViolet

Women Employed

Women’s Rights, Workers’ Rights and Racial Justice Advocates to host a #BlackWomensEqualPay Day, #DemandMore Social Media Storm TODAY, Tuesday, August 7, 2018 at 2:00 pm ET.

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  MEDIA ADVISORY

 Women’s Rights, Workers’ Rights and Racial Justice Advocates to host a #BlackWomensEqualPay Day, #DemandMore Social Media Storm TODAY, Tuesday, August 7, 2018 at 2:00 pm ET.

Download a PDF of this advisory.

 August 7, 2018

Washington, DC – Today, women’s rights, workers’ rights and racial justice advocates will host a social media storm at 2:00 pm ET/11:00 am PT in observance of Black Women’s Equal Pay Day – TODAY, Tuesday, August 7, 2018. Nationwide, Black Women’s Equal Pay Day events are being held online and in person throughout the week and in the coming weeks to raise awareness about the wage gap for Black women, its causes and its policy solutions. Our coalition will use the hashtags #BlackWomensEqualPay and #DemandMore to challenge everyone who supports equal pay for Black women and all women to demand more at work, as a consumer, and at the ballot box. Access the coalition toolkit and learn more about the gender wage gap for Black Women at www.blackwomensequalpayday.org.

WHAT:                     Black Women’s Equal Pay Day Coalition Social Media Storm

WHEN:                     TODAY, Tuesday, August 7, 2018 at

2:00 - 3:00 pm ET/11:00 am - 12:00  pm PT

WHERE:                  Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and Snapchat using hashtags

#BlackWomensEqualPay and #DemandMore.

BACKGROUND

Each year, Equal Pay Day is held in April, but when we look at the wage gap for women of color, the gap is far greater. When compared to all men, women are paid $.80 (cents) on the $1. When compared to White, non-Hispanic men, Black/African American women are paid only $.63 (cents) on the $1. This means the typical Black woman must work until August 2018 to be paid what the typical White man was paid at the end of December 2017. Despite being one of the most educated and civically engaged groups in America, Black women’s earnings also lag behind those of Black men and White, non-Hispanic women, underscoring the intersectional impact of gender and race on the wage gap.

There are many contributors to the wage gap, including employment discrimination, gender and race-based bias, lack of pay transparency, an inadequate minimum wage and tipped minimum wage, unfair workplace practices, lack of affordable child care, lack of quality public education system, a dismantling of organized labor, and inadequate access to capital.

On this #BlackWomensEqualPay Day, in this critical year for our nation and at this pivotal moment for democracy, Black women nationwide are demanding more for their contributions, their dollar and their vote. They are demanding tangible solutions from their employers, from the business community, and from elected officials at the local, state and federal level for addressing each of the contributors to the gap.

And as has always been the case, the beneficiary will be not only Black women and families, but all women and the American family. And so we call on everyone who supports equal pay to demand more as well.

Questions or need a contact? Email info@blackwomensequalpayday.org.

CO-SPONSORS:     As of this writing, the social media storm is co-sponsored by the following organizations. This list will be updated throughout the day at www.blackwomensequalpayday.org.

9to5 @9to5org

9to5 Wisconsin @9to5WI

A Better Balance @ABetterBalance

Alianza Nacional de Campesinas @campesinasunite

American Association of University Women @AAUW

American Civil Liberties Union @ACLU

Black Career Women's Network @bcwnetwork

Black Women's Roundtable @ncbcp_bwr

California National Organization for Women @CaliforniaNOW @canow

California Women's Law Center @CWLC_la

Catalyst @Catalystinc

Center for American Progress @CAPWomen @amprog

Chicago Foundation for Women @chifdn4women

Coalition of Labor Union Women @CLUWNational

CT Women's Education and Legal Fund (CWEALF) @PaidLeaveforCT

Demos @Demos_Org

Diversability @diversability

Equal Pay Today @equalpay2dayorg

Equal Rights Advocates @equalrightsadv

Family Values at Work @FmlyValuesWork

Feminist Majority @femmajority

Friends of the Delaware County Women's Commission @DelcoFOWC

Futures Without Violence @WithoutViolence

Gender Justice  @GenderJustice

Higher Heights for America @HigherHeights

In Our Own Voice: National Black Women's Reproductive Justice Agenda @BlackwomensRJ

Institute for Women's Policy Research @IWPResearch

Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA)@lclaa

Labor Project for Working Families @LaborProject, @CJLaborPolicy

Lady Parts Justice League @lpjleague

Latina Circle @thelatinacircle

Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law @lawyerscomm

Leadership Conference for Civil and Human Rights @civilrightsorg

Legal Aid at Work @Legalaidatwork

MomsRising and MamásConPoder@MomsRising @MamasConPoder

Movement Advancement Project @lgbtmap

MS Foundation @msfoundation

MS Low Income Child Care Initiative

NAACP @NAACP

National Asian Pacific American Women's Forum (NAPAWF) @napawf

National Black Justice Coalition @NBJCOnTheMove

National Black Worker Center Project @nbwcp

National Center for Law and Economic Justice @nclejustice

National Committee on Pay Equity

National Council of Jewish Women @NCJW

National Domestic Workers Alliance @domesticworkers

National Employment Lawyers Association @nela_HQ

National Network to End Domestic Violence @NNEDV

National Partnership for Women & Families @NPWF

National Resource Center on Domestic Violence @nrcdv

National Urban League @@NatUrbanLeague

National Women's Law Center @nwlc

NC Justice Center@ncjustice @ncworkers

Parents Together   

People For the American Way @peoplefor

PL+US: Paid Leave for the United States @PaidLeaveUS

Planned Parenthood Federation of America @PPBlackComm

PowHer New York@PowHerNY

Sargent Shriver National Center on Poverty Law @ShriverCenter

SisterSong: National Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective @sistersong_woc

Southwest Women's Law Center @swwomenslaw

State Innovation Exchange @stateinnovation

The Representation Project @RepresentPledge

UltraViolet @ultraviolet

United Food and Commercial Workers Union Women's Network @UFCW

United State of Women @USOWomen

Walker's Legacy @walkerslegacy

Women AdvaNCe @womenadvancenc

Women Employed @WomenEmployed

Women's Law Project @WomensLawProj

Women's Rights and Empowerment Network (WREN) @WRENetwork

YWCA San Francisco & Marin @ywcasfmarin

YWCA USA @YWCAUSA

Statement on the SCOTUS Nomination of Judge Kavanaugh

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From: Equal Pay Today!, a Project of the Tides Center

Contact: press@equalpaytoday.org, 202-588-7616, www.equalpaytoday.org

Washington, DC -- Equal Pay Today! – a non-partisan collaboration of organizations working to close the gender wage gap – stands with other women's and workers' rights advocates in expressing disappointment in President Trump's nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court of the United States.  Joi Chaney, Equal Pay Today's Executive Director/Campaign Director released the following statement: 

"President Trump's appointment of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to fill Justice Kennedy's vacancy on the Supreme Court was disappointing but unsurprising. The President has long shown little regard for the rights of women, promising to appoint jurists who would be willing to overturn Roe v. Wade and turn American law back generations. But reproductive rights aren't the only rights at risk."

"If confirmed, Judge Kavanaugh would usher in an era of dangerous rollbacks on access to safe reproductive care, environmental protections, consumer protections, immigrant rights, the separation of church and state, labor rights and equal employment protections -- protections that benefit everyone, regardless of party affiliation. In totality, Judge Kavanaugh's record seems to favor the interests of the powerful over the rights of the individual, which is at odds with the promise of America."

"Worse, he and other Trump judicial nominees are the hand-selected, byproduct of a decades long campaign by corporate interests, social conservatives, and White supremacists, united in their effort to shape the law in their favor and pack the judiciary with judges who will uphold those laws."

"In recent years, because Justice Kennedy served as a swing vote, these special interests could only count on success part of the time. If confirmed to a lifetime appointment on our nation's highest court, Mr. Kavanaugh would deliver the reliable fifth vote they have been working toward. It will be a great victory for them but a great loss for the nation, beginning with women, minorities, and working and middle class Americans."

"So, if not clear before, it should be clear now: The stakes of this nomination could not be higher and so our efforts to educate the American people about the record of this nominee and ensure a rigorous and thorough vetting process in the Senate could not be more important."

"All Senators must ask themselves: Is Judge Kavanaugh's confirmation to the Supreme Court in the best interests of the nation?" 

Equal Pay Today is one of many voicing concerns with Judge Kavanaugh's nomination, including several of our member organizations and partners:*

American Civil Liberties Union

Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights

National Women's Law Center

National Partnership for Women and Families

 

Statement on SCOTUS' "Epic" Rollback of Employee Protections Against Abuse

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From: Equal Pay Today!, a Project of the Tides Center

Contact: press@equalpaytoday.org, 202-588-7616, www.equalpaytoday.org

Washington, DC -- Yesterday, in a 5-4 decision written by Justice Neil Gorsuch, the Court ruled in Epic Systems Corporation v. Lewis that employers can use individual mandatory arbitration agreements to bar employees from joining together under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) to challenge workplace violations through litigation or even arbitration. In a strongly worded dissent, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg underscored the gravity of this setback for employees:

"For workers striving to gain from their employers decent terms and conditions of employment, there is strength in numbers. A single employee, Congress understood, is disarmed in dealing with an employer. See NLRB v. Jones & Laughlin Steel Corp., 301 U. S. 1, 33–34 (1937).  The Court today subordinates employee protective labor legislation to the Arbitration Act.  In so doing, the Court forgets the labor market imbalance that gave rise to the NLGA and the NLRA, and ignores the destructive consequences of diminishing the right of employees “to band together in confronting an employer.” NLRB v. City Disposal Systems, Inc., 465 U. S. 822, 835 (1984). Congressional correction of the Court’s elevation of the FAA over workers’ rights to act in concert is urgently in order."
"... The inevitable result of today’s decision will be the underenforcement of federal and state statutes designed to advance the well-being of vulnerable workers."
"... If employers can stave off collective employment litigation aimed at obtaining redress for wage and hours infractions, the enforcement gap is almost certain to widen. Expenses entailed in mounting individual claims will often far outweigh potential recoveries."
"... Fear of retaliation may also deter potential claimants from seeking redress alone."  

Equal Pay Today! – a non-partisan collaboration of organizations working to close the gender wage gap – stands with Justice Ginsburg, other workers' rights advocates, and the nation's employees in expressing extreme disappointment in the Court's decision.  Joi Chaney, Equal Pay Today's Executive Director/Campaign Director released the following statement: 

"One byproduct of the #metoo movement has been a renewed recognition that mandatory arbitration agreements can serve as a shield for employers who violate wage and hour laws and anti-employment discrimination laws, including laws that protect against sexual harassment and wage discrimination. Most employees don't even realize they are signing an agreement that will bar them from going to court; and even if they do, few understandably are willing to walk away from a job opportunity over it. For too long, employers have exploited this imbalance of power, especially in low-wage employment relationships. That said, the #metoo movement represented a culture shift and companies are now facing pressure to stop the mandatory nature of these agreements."
"Last week, Lyft and Uber pledged to end their use of mandatory arbitration agreements in cases of sexual harassment or assault. While inadequate in scope, these decisions were two steps forward in the right direction towards greater protections for employees, who should be free to mediate, arbitrate, or seek redress in court for workplace violations of any kind. It was our hope that other employers would follow suit."
"Yesterday, however, the Supreme Court took the nation three steps back by issuing a decision that will only renew the incentive for employers to use these unfair agreements and rob employees of their right to organize and file class claims. Without the threat of class actions, coupled with rollbacks to state and local labor law enforcement, employers are sent a message that they can get away with individual violations, especially against those most vulnerable, on the cheap."
"It is more important than ever that Congress stand with working Americans and reverse legislatively this decision. And, in the meantime, would-be "high road employers" should be strongly encouraged to curb the use of mandatory arbitration agreements. The nation is watching. Women are watching."

 

 

​​​​​​​The Future of Work is Female: EPT & members host panel at United State of Women 2018

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Friday, May 4, 2018

CONTACT

Delia Coleman, 415.575.2396, dcoleman@equalrights.org

LOS ANGELES – The American workforce is due for an extreme makeover, one that centers women and serves the needs of the modern family.

What should our workplaces look like in the Me Too era? What can policymakers do to end systemic workplace discrimination and close the gender wage gap? How do we address the intersectional challenges faced by women of color, immigrant women, indigenous women, LGBTQ women, and women with disabilities?

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Nine panelists from state and national women’s rights organizations, local government, and corporate America will answer these questions Sunday afternoon to a sold-out audience of nearly 350 attendees at the annual United State of Women Summit in Los Angeles.

“The Future of Work is Female: Re-designing the modern workplace” will feature speakers from Salesforce, Teach for America, ACLU, Los Angeles City Council, National Partnership for Women and Families, Southwest Women’s Law Center, and The Representation Project.

“This solution-focused panel will explore innovative workplace policies and practices that center women in all our diversity,” said host Joi Chaney, Campaign Director at Equal Pay Today.

Panelists will imagine how to redesign workplaces where women are treated and compensated equitably, where career and family co-exist, and where all workers are valued. Seem unrealistic? It’s not.

“Attendees can expect to leave with ideas they can bring their bosses Monday morning — and to their elected officials this fall,” said moderator Noreen Farrell, Executive Director of Equal Rights Advocates. Equal Rights Advocates is currently sponsoring seven workplace equality and anti-sexual harassment bills in California, known as the Stronger CA package.

The United State of Women is the nation’s premiere annual gathering of the women leaders and problem solvers. This year’s speakers and special guests include Michelle Obama, Jane Fonda, Tarana Burke, Brittany Packnett, Mayor Eric Garcetti, and Valerie Jarrett.

Event Details
Sunday, May 6
1:00 – 3:30 pm PT
University of Southern California Seeley Mudd Building, Room 123
Event link: http://ow.ly/15gD30jPd87

Location: The Seeley Mudd Building is located on USC Campus, on the corner of McClintock Avenue and Downey Way. For reference, see this map of the campus.

Speakers
Joi Chaney, Equal Pay Today (Host), @joitweets  
Noreen Farrell, Equal Rights Advocates (Moderator), @farrellERA
Sarah Fleisch Fink, National Partnership for Women and Families, @sffink  
Molly Ford, Salesforce, @QueenMollyMol 
Pameyla Herndon, Southwest Women’s Law Center@TallCypress 
Lenora Lapidus, American Civil Liberties Union@LenoraLapidus
Tolu Lawrence, The Representation Project@tolulawrence
Brittany Packnett, Teach for America@MsPackyetti
Monica Rodriguez, L.A. City Council@MRodCD7

#EqualPayDay Social Media Storm on April 10 at 2:00 pm ET

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Washington, DC -- This year, in honor of silence breakers everywhere, Equal Pay Today and our partners in the Equal Pay Day Coalition -- women's rights, civil rights, and labor rights advocates -- is using the 2018 Equal Pay Day on April 10th to shine a light on efforts to level the playing field between employees and employers by focusing on pay transparency as a means of closing the gender wage gap. Join us in calling for:

  • EEOC pay data collection;
  • Passage of the federal Paycheck Fairness Act and local/state bills that close the gender wage gap; and
  • High road employers who post salary ranges, limit the use of prior salary, conduct pay audits, and protect employees who discuss pay at work.

Access the coalition toolkit and learn more about the gender wage gap or other Equal Pay Day events at www.equalpaydayforall.org.

WHAT:                    Equal Pay Day Coalition Social Media Storm

WHEN:                   Tuesday, April 10, 2018 at 2:00 – 3:00 pm ET

WHERE:                 Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and Snapchat using hashtags #equalpayday, #talkpay, and #time4transparency.

BACKGROUND: Equal Pay Day -- April 10, 2018 -- is the approximate date the typical woman must work to make what the typical man made at the end of 2017. Women who work full time, year-round in the United States are paid only 80 cents for every dollar paid to their male counterparts. Over a 40-year career, this can cost a woman over $400,000. When you factor in race, the wage gap is wider. When compared to White, non-Hispanic men, Latinas earn 54 cents for every dollar, Black women earn 63 cents for every dollar, and White women earn 79 cents for every dollar.

Therefore, while Equal Pay Day compares all women to all men, the Equal Pay Days for women of color fall much later in the year. Women of color, therefore, must work far longer to achieve equity, while losing far more over the course of their lifetimes. That’s not equitable at all. And in 2018, it’s no longer acceptable.

It’s time for multi-pronged solutions that seek to close the gender wage gap by addressing its many contributors: lack of pay transparency, hiring, pay and promotion discrimination based on gender and at the intersections of race, national origin, sexual orientation, pregnancy, and caregiver status; occupational segregation; wage theft and an inadequate minimum wage; unfair workplace policies; lack of paid leave; lack of affordable childcare; and sexual harassment in the workplace.

Access the coalition toolkit and learn more about the gender wage gap or other Equal Pay Day events at www.equalpaydayforall.org.

CO-SPONSORS: As of this writing, the social media storm is co-sponsored by the following organizations:


#VOTEPROCHOICE
9to5
A Better Balance
ACLU
AFL-CIO
AFSCME
Alianza Nacional de Campesinas
American Association of University Women
Asian Pacific American Labor Alliance, AFL-CIO
California Women's Law Center
Catalyst
Coalition of Labor Union Women
Communications Workers of America
Connecticut Women's Education and Legal Fund (CWEALF)
Disciples Center for Public Witness
Economic Policy Institute
Equal Pay Today
Equal Rights Advocates
Family Values @ Work in partnership with Labor Project for Working Families
Feminist Majority
Friends of the Delaware County Women's Commission
Gender Justice
Herd on the Hill
Institute for Women's Policy Research
Labor Council for Latin American Advancement
Labor Project for Working Families
Latina Circle
Legal Aid at Work
Let Justice Roll
Main Street Alliance
Michigan Progressive Women’s Caucus
MomsRising MamasConPoder
Movement Advancement Project (MAP)
MS Low Income Child Care Initiative
Ms. Foundation for Women
NARAL Pro-Choice America
National Asian Pacific American Women's Forum (NAPAWF)
National Black Worker Center Project
National Center for Law and Economic Justice
National Council of Jewish Women
National Domestic Workers Alliance
National Employment Lawyers Association
National Partnership for Women & Families
National Women's Law Center
New York Women’s Foundation
Parity.org
PathWays PA
People For the American Way
Progressive Congress Action Fund
Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism
She Geeks Out
Southwest Women's Law Center
State Innovation Exchange
The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights
The Program on Gender Analysis in Economics (PGAE) at American University
The Sargent Shriver National Center on Poverty Law
The United State of Women
UltraViolet
United Food and Commercial Workers Union Women's Network
Walker's Legacy
Women Employed
Women For Action
Women For Justice
Women's Law Project
Women's Rights and Empowerment Network (WREN)
Workplace Equity Project (WE)
Young People For
YWCA USA

 

#EQUALPAYDAY COALITION HOLDS FB LIVE WITH MEMBERS OF CONGRESS ON EQUAL PAY DAY AT 4:00 PM ET

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ADVISORY

Download a pdf of this advisory.

 April 9, 2018

Washington, DC -- This year, in honor of silence breakers everywhere, Equal Pay Today and our partners in the Equal Pay Day Coalition -- women's rights, civil rights, and labor rights advocates -- is using the 2018 Equal Pay Day on April 10th to shine a light on efforts to level the playing field between employees and employers by focusing on pay transparency as a solution to the gender wage gap. Join Equal Pay Today, Center for American Progress, Members of Congress and colleagues for a Facebook Live on Tuesday, April 10th at 4:00 pm ET to call for:

  • EEOC pay data collection;
  • Passage of the federal Paycheck Fairness Act and local/state bills that close the gender wage gap; and
  • High road employers who post salary ranges, limit the use of prior salary, conduct pay audits, and protect employees who discuss pay at work.

As of this writing, confirmed participants include:

  • Congresswoman Brenda L. Lawrence (MI-14) 
  • Joi Chaney, Equal Pay Today 
  • Jocelyn Frye, Center for American Progress 
  • Emily Martin, National Women’s Law Center 
  • Deborah Vagins, American Association of University Women 

Additional participants are expected.

Access the #EqualPayDay - #Time4TransparencyToolkit at www.equalpaydayforall.org.

WHAT:                     #EqualPayDay Facebook Live with Advocates & Members of Congress

 WHEN:                    Tuesday, April 10, 2018 at 4:00 pm ET

WHERE:                  facebook.com/americanprogress

BACKGROUND:     Equal Pay Day -- April 10, 2018 -- is the approximate date the typical woman must work to make what the typical man made at the end of 2017. Women who work full time, year-round in the United States are paid only 80 cents for every dollar paid to their male counterparts. Over a 40-year career, this can cost a woman over $400,000. When you factor in race, the wage gap is wider. When compared to White, non-Hispanic men, Latinas earn 54 cents for every dollar, Black women earn 63 cents for every dollar, and White women earn 79 cents for every dollar.

Therefore, while Equal Pay Day compares all women to all men, the Equal Pay Days for women of color fall much later in the year. Women of color, therefore, must work far longer to achieve equity, while losing far more over the course of their lifetimes. That’s not equitable at all. And in 2018, it’s no longer acceptable.

It’s time for multi-pronged solutions that seek to close the gender wage gap by addressing its many contributors: lack of pay transparency, hiring, pay and promotion discrimination based on gender and at the intersections of race, national origin, sexual orientation, pregnancy, and caregiver status; occupational segregation; wage theft and an inadequate minimum wage; unfair workplace policies; lack of paid leave; lack of affordable childcare; and sexual harassment in the workplace.

Access the #EqualPayDay - #Time4TransparencyToolkit at www.equalpaydayforall.org.

 

 

 

#EQUALPAYDAY COALITION HOLDS PRIMER ON THE GENDER WAGE GAP – TODAY, MONDAY APRIL 9 AT 2:00 PM ET 

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ADVISORY  

Download a pdf of this advisory.

April 9, 2018

Washington, DC -- This year, in honor of silence breakers everywhere, Equal Pay Today and our partners in the Equal Pay Day Coalition -- women's rights, civil rights, and labor rights advocates -- is using the 2018 Equal Pay Day on April 10th to shine a light on efforts to level the playing field between employees and employers by focusing on pay transparency as a solution to the gender wage gap. To get prepared, Equal Pay Today and Center for American Progress are hosting a #EqualPayDay Primer on Monday, April 9th at 2:00 pm ET. Participants include:

  • Joi Chaney, Equal Pay Today
  • Sarah Fleisch Fink, National Partnership for Women & Families
  • Jocelyn Frye, Center for American Progress
  • Emily Martin, National Women’s Law Center
  • Deborah Vagins, American Association of University Women

Join us for a discussion of the gender wage gap, why its important to observe Equal Pay Day, and solutions for achieving pay equity.

Access the #EqualPayDay - #Time4TransparencyToolkit at www.equalpaydayforall.org.

WHAT:                     #EqualPayDay Primer with Advocates

 WHEN:                    Monday, April 9, 2018 at 2:00 pm ET

 WHERE:                  facebook.com/americanprogress

BACKGROUND:     Equal Pay Day -- April 10, 2018 -- is the approximate date the typical woman must work to make what the typical man made at the end of 2017. Women who work full time, year-round in the United States are paid only 80 cents for every dollar paid to their male counterparts. Over a 40-year career, this can cost a woman over $400,000. When you factor in race, the wage gap is wider. When compared to White, non-Hispanic men, Latinas earn 54 cents for every dollar, Black women earn 63 cents for every dollar, and White women earn 79 cents for every dollar.

Therefore, while Equal Pay Day compares all women to all men, the Equal Pay Days for women of color fall much later in the year. Women of color, therefore, must work far longer to achieve equity, while losing far more over the course of their lifetimes. That’s not equitable at all. And in 2018, it’s no longer acceptable.

It’s time for multi-pronged solutions that seek to close the gender wage gap by addressing its many contributors: lack of pay transparency, hiring, pay and promotion discrimination based on gender and at the intersections of race, national origin, sexual orientation, pregnancy, and caregiver status; occupational segregation; wage theft and an inadequate minimum wage; unfair workplace policies; lack of paid leave; lack of affordable childcare; and sexual harassment in the workplace.

Access the #EqualPayDay - #Time4TransparencyToolkit at www.equalpaydayforall.org.

 

 

 

 

Medium Post | American Women are Power Rising

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Equal Pay Today's Executive Director, Joi Chaney, posted a Medium blog on her reflections for anyone fighting for women's equality in the workplace at the intersection of Black History Month and Women's History Month.

"Last month, like every black woman — with the means and opportunity to invest in a movie night — I ran, not walked, to the opening of Black Panther. All the reviews are correct; it was a perfect, glorious display of African Diasporic excellence — both what is and what could have been. The latter sentiment left me wistful, and more than a little angry for all that my ancestors endured, all that my community endures, and all that our children are likely to endure for some time to come. Thus, when I arrived in Atlanta, GA last Thursday for the #WearePowerRising Summit — a national policy development, civic engagement, and economic empowerment convening of nearly 1000 African American women, I was ready raise a little hell. What I got instead was the healing my soul needed in times such as these. I found myself in a real-life Wakanda."

"At every turn, I met a “Nakia,” a “Shuri,” a “T’Challa,” an “Okoye, and together we were the “Dora Milaje” targeting the micro- and macro-aggressions and intersections of sexism, racism, classism, and xenophobia in all it’s manifestations. We were creating a Black Women’s Agenda, but given the gravitas, depth and breadth of the women in the room and the continuing rise in the political and economic power of Black Women — rather, the belated recognition of that power — it was clear that we were also creating an American agenda."

"For my part, my humble charge is employment equality for women. I sought to return from Wakanda, GA with insights into addressing the workplace challenges faced by all women. As we sit on the cusp of Black History Month and Women’s History Month, #Igot5onit, Star Jones — five takeaways for a nation of woke women."

Read the rest on Medium.

 

#PayUsMoreTouchUsLess

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By Joi Chaney, Equal Pay Today!

For those saying, “what does sexual harassment have to do with equal pay and women’s economic security?”

Pay us more, touch us less!
— Noreen Farrell, Equal Rights Advocates for Every Woman

While sexual harassment in the workplace can manifest itself as sexual assault or some other violation of local and state law, it is, at the very least, employment discrimination on the basis of sex prohibited by Title VII of the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964, which is enforced by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).  Similarly, Title VII as well as the Equal Pay Act of 1963, which EEOC also enforces, prohibit wage discrimination on the basis of sex.

As has been noted by #TimesUp activists, one form of discrimination -- harassment  -- often exists in concert with other forms of discrimination -- pay discrimination. Underpaid persons are often undervalued in the workplace and vice versa, making them more vulnerable to harassment and discrimination and less likely to report abuse or be believed when they do report. As the EEOC is investigating a claim of sexual harassment, investigators will often find evidence of wage discrimination, something that -- given all we know about the difficulty of uncovering pay discrimination -- might otherwise have gone undetected.

Even in the absence of traditional pay discrimination, sexual harassment can depress wages, economic stability, and professional mobility. One study shows that women who are harassed are 6.5 times more likely to change jobs, even when it is not professionally advantageous to do so. Harassment also exacerbates "voluntary" occupational segregation as some women will seek to avoid careers -- even those that are higher paying -- if they believe those careers or positions would expose them to a hostile work environment. They may embrace instead careers in female-dominated professions that feel safer -- even though they may historically pay less.

So "what does sexual harassment have to do with equal pay?" The answer is: “Everything.” #PayUsMoreTouchUsLess.